“Just do it,” the little voice cackled.

After procrastinating for a year, I started listening to my own advice. It started in my first semester of graduate school in the counseling psychology program, when the professor of my “Theories of Personality” class assigned her students to develop their own theory of personality, and to state one thing that we felt would bring about change in a person.

Wait. What? Was she being serious? Yes, she was. I set the gears in my brain to “think” and came up with the basis of my theory of personality. Without going into sleep-inducing detail, following are some highlights:

  • I labeled my theory of personality the Biological-Evolutionary Theory.
  • It states that people change by doing something; that we have control over the doing component of our behavior. If we markedly change that component, we cannot avoid changing the thinking, feeling, and physiological components as well.
  • The more we get involved in an “active doing” behavior that is very different from what we were doing when experiencing misery, the more we will also change what we think, feel, and experience from our bodies.
  • And if what we do gives us greater control, it will be accompanied by better feelings, more pleasant thoughts, and greater physical comfort.

There are more components to this theory, but for the purposes of this blog, I simply needed to start doing it! It has taken me over ten days to get this post published. Navigating the dashboard, which I like to call the cockpit, the about page, editing this and that, deleting things I wanted to save, and trying to upload a photo all proved to be more challenging then developing a theory of personality.

As it happens, I never published it. I hit “save draft” instead, and I believe there are several different versions of this blog. . . somewhere. I thought it said that it had been published. Oh, the challenges are great, but I started doing it and my thoughts about it have . . . basically stayed the same. So I’ve just negated my theory of personality. On the upside, there is still time for my “doing” to result in better feelings, more pleasant thoughts about blogging, and greater physical comfort, i.e., less stress about doing it at all, let alone about doing it right.

I would have benefited from the help of my brother, who is my computer tech hero, but he lives 300 miles away, and helping me on the phone could take up to 24 hours. I persevered and accomplished the task in less than two weeks.

One could say I have evolved (another buzzword in my theory) ever so slightly, but there is time so see better results as I fuddle through the fog that is blogging.

We shall see . . .

Just as an aside – I think that’s a category in this theme, and I’ll figure it out in the next ten days or so – if you live in the greater Seattle area and you require IT assistance, Dave can help. He can be reached at deweydl@gmail.com. He gave me permission to list his email address.

Cheers and happy to ya!

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About Dana J. Dewey

I was a slow learner as a child and to overcome my fear of school, as an adult I attended many of them. I ended up with a master of science degree in counseling psychology and I'm a licensed mental health counselor who is passionate about mental health. This blog is about life, joy, and the pursuit of good mental health, and the eclectic way in which it's achieved. I'm blogging a memoir, The Tail Gunner's Daughter, and later, Parent-Able: Seven Strategies for Raising a Physically Disabled Child Without Going Insane.
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